Best Recipes: Ice Cream Cookie Pizza

by: Donna Monday

Gather everybody around for this really cool cold pizza. Each person will have lots of fun topping their ice cream pizza slices with lots of yummy goodies. Great for kids parties.

Cookie

¾ cup firmly packed brown sugar ½ cup butter or margarine, softened 1 egg ½ teaspoon vanilla 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup uncooked quick-cooking oats 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt

Ice Cream

1 quart vanilla ice cream, slightly softened

Toppings

Fudge sauce, strawberry sauce, caramel sauce, sliced bananas, sliced strawberries, m&m candies, gummi candy, coarsely chopped chocolate sandwich cookies, chopped candy bars, candy sprinkles, nuts.

Cookie 'N Cream ice-cream on top of warm choco...
Cookie ‘N Cream ice-cream on top of warm chocolate chip cookies. (Photo credit: theGsayeth)

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Combine brown sugar, butter, egg, and vanilla in large bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until creamy. Reduce speed to low; add flour, oats, baking soda and salt. Beat until well mixed.

Spread dough evenly into ungreased 12-inch pizza pan. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown. Cool completely.

Spread ice cream evenly over cooled cookie. Freeze until firm (1 to 2 hours). To serve, cut into wedges; top with desired topping.

About the author© Donna Monday Love Cookies? All your favorites here http://www.best-cookie-jar-recipes.com

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Best Cookies: Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies

by: Donna Monday

These cookies are a delightful chocolaty twist on the traditional oatmeal cookie.

Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Cookies

1 ½ cups sugar
1 cup butter, softened
2 eggs
2 ½ (1 oz.) squares unsweetened baking chocolate, melted
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
3 cups uncooked quick-cooking oats
1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions

Heat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine sugar and butter in large bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until creamy. Add eggs, chocolate and vanilla; continue beating, scraping bowl often, until well mixed. Reduce speed to low; add flour, baking powder and salt. Beat until well mixed. Stir in oats and chocolate chips by hand.

Drop dough by rounded tablespoonfuls, 2-inches apart, onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until set. Do Not Overbake.

Oatmeal cookies with orange zest, golden raisi...

About the author:
© Donna Monday
Love Cookies? All your favorites here
http://www.best-cookie-jar-recipes.com

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Barbecue Basics for all

by: Laura Kjer

Since the Stone Age, man has been perfecting the art of cooking using a direct flame. If you were to ask someone about the history of barbecue, you would most likely get a response similar to the
statement above. However that would not be quite right as there is a fundamental difference between simply cooking with a flame and having a barbecue. If you don’t add some sauce, to the direct flame method, you are grilling, not having a barbecue. To truly barbecue is to baste and slow cook meat 5 or 6 hours at a low temperature (around 200 degrees), over wood or charcoal.

Today when you think of going to a barbecue, you may conjure up the idea of a hamburger or steak, so big and juicy, it melts in your mouth. Alternatively, perhaps a hot dog grilled to perfection with all the toppings. The phrase barbecue has evolved to mean either the meat served or the social event where the meat served
has been specially prepared to represent a
barbecue taste. Regardless of which area of the US you choose as your favorite for barbecue, the barbecue is an American Tradition, handed down from generation to generation. There’s no chance the barbecue party will lose it’s appeal anytime soon.

While there’s no question that the barbecue is an American delicacy, there are many different theories as to where its origins lie. The state of Texas, Virginia, the Carolinas, or Georgia, each
area has it’s own definition and history of
barbecue. It may well be that each area has it’s own rightful claim to the barbecue history as each uses different methods and sauces to make their own unique barbecue.

And there would be no BBQ without a Texas barbecue sauce, which is thick and sweet with a rich tomato flavour. Texas sauce also uses a dry-rub mixture of seasonings which is applied to the beef and then the meat is hung over the BBQ to slow cook.

The southeast barbecue sauce, is a thinner sauce, with more of a vinegary taste. Their meat of choice is likely to be pork. The method used here is to`use a pit or enclosure to concentrate the cooking heat and smoke around the meat whilst it is being prepared.

Almost every family has their own unique taste and method used to get just the right barbecue. At your next barbecue, if you want to rev up the conversation between barbecue connoisseurs, just casually ask, Do you know the difference between barbecue and grilling? Or, where did the barbecue originate? Of course, it may depend upon the number of drinks you have served as to the answers you get. But the responses are sure to be varied and interesting.

About the author:
Laura Kjer is the webmaster of
Shop Barbecue which is a
premier source of information about Barbecue. For more
information, go to: http://shopbarbecue.com

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Best Cookies: Oatmeal Crispies

by: Donna Monday

These crisp, light, crunchy cookies are perfect with a cup of coffee or tea.

Oatmeal Crispies

1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
½ cup butter, softened
½ cup shortening
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups uncooked quick-cooking oats
1 ½ cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt

Directions

Combine brown sugar, butter and shortening in large bowl. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until creamy. Add eggs and vanilla; continue beating until well mixed. Reduced speed to low; add oats, flour, baking soda and salt. Beat, scraping bowl often, until well mixed.

Divide dough in half. Shape each half into 6-inch log. Wrap each in plastic food wrap. Refrigerate until firm (2 to 3 hours).

Heat oven to 350 degrees.

Cut logs into ¼ -inch slices with sharp knife. Place slices 1-inch apart onto ungreased cookie sheets. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until lightly browned. Let stand 1 to 2 minutes; remove from cookie sheets.

About the author:
© Donna Monday
Love Cookies? All your favorites here
http://www.best-cookie-jar-recipes.com

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