Organize Your Home Storage and Simplify Your Life!

by: Andrew Porter

Be delighted with yourself — committing to organize your home is the first step in actually doing it! The Linen Closet will need attending to eventually so lets go there now.

If you have excess laundry to deal with, you probably have a linen closet that is less than user-friendly. Once you have clean towels, rags, and other linens to put away, you won’t do it if thier destination is less-than-appealing.

So let’s organize it! This is the first place where you’ll have to be brutally honest with

English: Milo the cat in a laundry basket bein...
English: Milo the cat in a laundry basket being helpful. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

yourself about what you keep and what you get rid of. When I say, “get rid of,” I don’t necessarily mean it ends up in the trash—if it’s towels, bedding, etc., that are in bad condition, your local animal shelter would be grateful for your donation. They always need things for the dogs and cats to lay on in their runs and crates, and your cast-offs in this area will be eagerly accepted.

 

Take stock of what you have for shelves. Do you have wooden or wire shelves? Do you have problems with things “falling through” if you have wire shelves? If so, you don’t have to worry and go buy scrap wood to line the shelves with—a simple piece of shelf-lining (you know, that bumpy green stuff that comes in rolls) will lie nicely and prevent small things from falling through. If necessary, put some of that down.

Now take a look and see what you’ve got in terms of extra bedding.

How many beds in your home? You should have a minimum of 1 extra bedding-set for each bed, a maximum of 2. Think about it before you start to write me and tell me why you need 6 sets of bedding for each bed—if you have small children who have nighttime accidents (or get the stomach flu in the middle of the night), you might have to change sheets in the morning (or the middle of the night if it’s barf!), and you’ll have some clean ones to put on. You’ll put the dirty ones in the washer and get the machine started on that task. Then you’ll swap things to the dryer. You’ll still have clean sheets on the bed and if you’ve got 2 extra sets, another clean one in the linen closet.

So now with that argument won, go through your bedding. Do you have mis-matched pieces? If so, put them in the donation pile. Do you have twin pieces mixed in with king pieces? If so, separate them in two piles. Make sure everything is folded (I’ll give you a pass on the fitted sheets—those are impossible to fold neatly!). Now set aside one or two shelves for your bedding. Make sure that the bedding for the queen bed is not piled up with the stuff for the crib or twin bed. You can fold the stuff in squares or fold it in to long rectangles and then roll it. Either way is acceptable—it just depends on how much space you’ve got.

Now we move on to towels and other things in your linen closet…

3. Take stock of your towels, washcloths, and other terrycloth things. Do you have towels that are holey or bleach-stained? Do you have towels that aren’t very absorbent from using too much fabric softener? Do you have towels that don’t match your current bathroom décor? Donate them. Keep only that which matches your décor (unless you turn it in to a rag), and only that which wouldn’t embarrass you to put out for guests when they visit. That should pare down your towel collection to a more manageable number.

I can’t tell you an exact number that is appropriate here—that depends on how many members are in your family. What I can suggest is 2 towels per person—one that’s currently hanging in the bathroom and one clean one that can be conscripted into service when the current one is in the wash. Do you have washcloths? One for every-other day of the week would be appropriate—many people don’t use them anymore, in this age of scrubbies, poufs, and other facial cleansing methods.

Do you have a rag-pile (or kitchen-towel pile) in your linen closet? If so, fold those and put them on a shelf that’s easy to access. You’ll use those most frequently, so make them easy to reach and use. Again, sort through and see what’s in reasonable condition and put the rest in the pile for the animal shelter.

What other things are in your linen closet? Do you have table linens there? If so, do you know what’s there? Are they neat enough that when you need them you don’t have to go digging and put the iron on “fry it silly” to get the wrinkles out? If any of the above is true, pull them out, wash, sort, keep only the best, and fold (or press) them quickly and put them away.

Finally, if you have other miscellaneous things (doilies, candlesticks, etc.) in your linen closet, set a shelf aside for those things. If you don’t have a full shelf to ascribe to them, use a shelf that’s only half-full of other items. Again, sort through and keep only what you’re in love with—anything else can be donated to a charity-resale shop, given to siblings, or sold on eBay.

Don’t keep things “just in case” great-aunt Mildred comes by—she won’t, and if she does, she probably won’t remember what it was. Remember, you’re organizing your home so that it’s not just a house of stuff for your family. That’s much more important than not offending a distant relative!

Congratulations—you’ve won the battle with your linen closet. Isn’t it such a nice feeling to open up a closet and not be in danger of the falling towel zone?

About the author:
Andrew Porter: Is a home improvement consultant and frequent contributor to ClosetOrganizer4U.com.

For closet organizers, accessories and design plans, visit:http://www.closetorganizer4u.com

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Learn some feng shui guidelines for your children’s room

by: Jakob JellingBy Jakob Jelling
http://www.fengshuicrazy.com

Feng shui indicates some specific guidelines regarding children’s spaces and bedrooms. The way we decorate them and the way we distribute the furniture should be done by following those principles in order to achieve harmony and help your children feel comfortable in that space.

One first important aspect to have into account about a child’s room is the colors within it. You should pay special attention to the colors you choose for this space, not only for the walls but for the decoration in general. According to feng shui, a child’s room should be in earth colors such as light oranges, terracotta or warm yellows. These colors would make them feel safe.

Child's room Panoramic
Child’s room Panoramic (Photo credit: The Pug Father)

Colors that are cold, such as blue or gray shades should never predominate in a child’s room, since they could bring them insecurity feelings. Besides, the wall and furniture colors should be in balance as well. It is also important to remark that too bright colors are not recommended for a child’s bedroom.

If your child is very active, you should balance this through the colors you choose for his bedroom; they should be light and relaxing colors such as beiges or very light oranges. On the other hand, if your child is quiet, you should choose warm orange or yellow colors which would be in balance his personality.

As with all bedrooms, the bed position is very important. First of all, your child’s bed should not be right across the door. Besides, it should ideally have a wall at one side and be in such a position that allows him to easily see the door. If possible, the bed should be in a corner since that would make the child feel secure and sleep better.

Also, the position in which the child sleeps can influence the time he wakes up and how deep he sleeps. If your child has problems waking up, you should place his bed in a position which allows him to sleep with his head towards east or south. On the other hand, if he has light sleep, his head should be towards north or west.

About the author:
Jakob Jelling is the founder of http://www.fengshuicrazy.com Please visit his website and learn all the feng shui tips you’ll ever need!

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Bedrooms – Should Be A Safe Haven

by: Beverly Marshall

We spend a great deal of time in our bedrooms, hopefully 8 hours, and decorating ideas for them should reflect that and be well thought out. Very few other places should capture our attention like that of the bedroom. It doesn’t matter if you are alone in the bed or not, you might try looking at this room with Feng Shui eyes. Feng Shui is the Chinese art of placement. In Feng Shui, it is said to make a difference how you feel according to where you place the bed and what is around you when you sleep. Feng Shui suggests that you should feel safe and secure in a bedroom. You don’t need to practice Feng Shui to realize that. You should also feel comfortable and very calm energy there because you spend so much time in that room. Sometimes that feeling you get speaks volumes about how you sleep and it can determine how much time you really want to spend in the bedroom.

Bedroom_BB

When you think about the bedroom, you may be thinking about a partner or finding a partner. Since practicing Feng Shui involves a lot of metaphor; take a look around your room and see what you are telling the universe by your furniture placement and surroundings. If you have pictures around you of a figure standing alone, you are reinforcing the reality of being alone. If you want to feel more comfortable, sleep well and/or find a partner; check out a few of the following guidelines. For a total list of guidelines; check out http://www.bedding-4u.com
• Place two pink candles or hearts on a side table in a bedroom; suggesting you would like a partner
• Don’t have photos of family or other friends in the bedroom as this is “your” space. Pictures of you and your partner is okay
• Place the bed so that the head of the head of the bed is opposite the door. You want to easily see people as they enter
• The head of the bed should not be over a window or you may feel lack of support
• Don’t have a TV staring at you in bed. If you must watch TV, cover it up before you go to sleep at night
• Try not to bring work home from the office; only to work on it in the bedroom. You are sending the wrong message
• Do not have a lot of books surrounding your head when you sleep. All of that information could be confusing and distracting your sleep
• Never place a ceiling fan above the bed because you don’t want the feeling of having fan blades above your head
• Having a night table on each side of the bed suggests there is another person in the bedroom, even when you do not have a partner
• Paint your bedroom pink. I painted mine pink and two weeks later I met my husband
• Make sure your bedroom door opens and closes easily. Noisy doors are disturbing
• Place earthy elements in a bedroom such as plants, stone, crystals or things that remind you of the earth
These are just a few bedroom decorating thoughts using Feng Shui as a guide. Have a clear intention of what you want in life and go about getting it. You can apply Feng Shui guidelines throughout the home and office with this ancient art and just see what a difference you will feel in your home or bedroom with a few subtle changes.

About the author:
Bev Marshall is a successful freelance writer Aromatherapist and Feng Shui consultant offering guidance and suggestions for consumers buying bedding, mattresses, comforters, bedspreads, and baby bedding. Her many articles can be found at http://www.bedding-4u.com She gives information and tips to help you save money and make informed buying decisions.

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