Colour & Cosmetics

by: Jane Thurnell-Read

Many people avoid artificial colours in their foods, but don’t check out the colours in cosmetics and personal care products. It is only in recent years that cosmetics have started to carry a full list of ingredients on their packaging.

Making sense of the ingredients can be difficult for the lay person. This is particularly true for colourings, which often go under the guise of numbers rather than names.

In many countries colours in cosmetics are listed as colour index numbers. C.I. numbers are allocated by the Society of Dyers and Colourists. The scheme covers colours used in food, personal care products, cosmetics, household products and fabric dyeing. So, for example you will not normally see ‘tartrazine’ listed in your lipstick ingredients, but it may be there listed as C.I. 19140. Erythrosine will be listed as C.I. 45430, and so on.

The USA uses a different system: the FD & C colors have been categorised by the American Food & Drink Administration for use in foods, drugs and cosmetics. So in this system tartrazine is FD & C yellow 5, and amaranth is FD & C red 2.

Ball-and-stick model of the Allura Red AC mole...
Ball-and-stick model of the Allura Red AC molecule, also known as Food Red 17, a dark red azo dye used as a food coloring. This image shows the sodium salt. Colour code (click to show) : Black: Carbon, C : White: Hydrogen, H : Red: Oxygen, O : Blue: Nitrogen, N : Lilac: Sodium, Na : Yellow: Sulfur, S (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The ‘E Number’ system is used by the European Community (EC). This is a system of giving code numbers to food additives, some of which are also used in cosmetics and personal care products. This system is also used in some other countries but without the E prefix, so E102 becomes simply colour ‘102’.

All this confusion for the average consumer would not be important, but for the fact that some of these colours are known to cause problems in susceptible individuals. For example, tartrazine (also known as FD & C Yellow 5, CI 1914 and EI02) can cause migraines, itching, rhinitis and agitation in susceptible individuals. Many individuals avoid its use in food, but do not realise how extensively it is used in cosmetics, such as lipstick, and personal care products.

The big worries in terms of colours in cosmetics and personal care products are lipstick, coloured lip balms, lip gloss and lip pencils, because anyone who uses these regularly ‘eats’ a fair quantity over their life time, but these colours also appear in skin cream, foundation, mascara and so on too. (Remember also that these colours can also be in ‘natural’ cosmetics and skin care products.)

Another worry is that even the ‘experts’ cannot agree on an international ‘safe’ list of colours, so that a colour may be allowed in one country, but banned elsewhere. For example, quinoline yellow is allowed within the European Community and in some other countries, but is banned in Japan, Norway and the United States.

As ever, the advice is: keep yourself informed and read the label. Here is a list of the different names and numbers that common colourings go under:

Tartrazine: E102 or FD & C Yellow 5 or C.I. 19140
Quinoline yellow or E104 or C.I. 47005
Sunset yellow or E110 or FD & C Yellow 6 or C.I. 15985
Amaranth or E123 or FD & C Red 2 or C.I. 16185
Ponceau 4R or E124 or C.I. 16255
Erythrosine or E127 or FD & C Red 3 or C.I. 45430
Red 2G or E128 or C.I. 18050
Allura red AC or E129 or FD & C Red 40 or C.I. 16035
Patent blue V or E131 or C.I. 42051
Indigo carmine or E132 or FD & C Blue 2 or C.I. 73015
Brilliant blue FCF or FD & C Blue 1 or C.I. 42090
Fast green FCF or FD & C Green 3 or C.I. 42053
Green S or E142 or C.I. 44090

About the author:
Jane Thurnell-Read researches and writes on health and well-being. Visit her site http://www.healthandgoodness.com for well-researched articles on a whole range of topics. She’s not trying to sell you anything – this is an information web site. the most common unsolicited comment from people who surf this site is “brilliant”.

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For the very best in cosmetics, use Mac Cosmetics.

by: Mike Yeager

Mac cosmetics are just the type of cosmetics women are looking for. Mac cosmetics can change you, in a matter of minutes, from the average looking, ordinary, girl-next-door into a stunning beauty. Mac cosmetics have a whole range of makeup, haircare, and skincare products for you. For that special evening out, all you need is your set of Mac cosmetics and some time in front of the mirror. However, Mac cosmetics are, after all, only cosmetics. As soon as you remove your makeup, the beautiful old you seems to disappear. How would you feel about having a glowing complexion, lovely skin and a head of shining, healthy hair – all achieved without constantly using makeup? Sound good? Well, it’s true, and is now very much achievable! Mac cosmetics have recently introduced skin care products that will make your skin glow radiantly without constantly putting on makeup. In addition, they have developed products that will make your hair and complexion beautiful all day long without any makeup. In fact, tests conducted on a group of healthy, female volunteers with age ranging from 40 to 65 years old exhibited clear signs of improvements in wrinkle reduction, skin softness, hydration, smoothness and firmness when using these new Mac cosmetics.

Choosing the Mac Cosmetic that is right for you

It can be difficult sometime to know what Mac makeup cosmetic is right for you. Some Mac cosmetics can be very expensive. If you are looking to find cheap Mac cosmetics, try buying Cosmetic Mac wholesale. Come, try these new Mac cosmetic products that are completely safe and natural and you too will find the joy of looking the best you can.

About the author:
Mike Yeager
Publisher
http://www.a1-beauty-4u.com/

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Cosmetics – the practical way to BEAUTY!

by: Mike Yeager

Want that healthy, tanned look without that elusive Spanish holiday? Use cosmetics! For cosmetics is the easiest way to enhance your image. Image is what the cosmetic industry sells through its products. And although it’s up to you to believe it or not, I’m sure you won’t complain. Definitely not when you can get “that look” without being much the poorer for it.

There are cosmetics for almost every need.

There are cosmetics for almost every need. Foundations, lipsticks, hair dyes, hair straighteners, hair sprays, skin conditioners, contact lenses, sunscreens, tanning products, glosses, shadows and what have you….. The list is seemingly endless. Branded cosmetics abound! Choose between MAC cosmetics or Mary Kay cosmetics if you will. And if you can’t afford it – well, there’s always discount cosmetics which give you famous brands at a fraction of their price! So despair not! Get rid of that patch of graying hair, mask that niggling pimple, and banish the ugliness of your nose albeit temporarily with some prudently used cosmetics. Do take care, of course, to check out the contents. Certain cosmetic additives are harmful for the skin. Don’t use so called “cosmeceuticals” unless their content, medicinal benefits and safety is verified. Having done that, go right ahead and indulge. And, if a lipstick is all that’s between you and that Marilyn Monroe look, go, get it!

About the author:
Mike Yeager
Publisher
http://www.a1-beauty-4u.com/

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A Look at Make-Up Infomercials –

by: Richard Romando

Using a variety of female celebrities, infomercial producers have once again created a huge market where none existed. That’s not to say that make up products didn’t exist. They did. And they were a multibillion dollar industry long before anybody ever thought of infomercials.

Starting in the early twentieth century with the advent of movies and their subsequent side affect – beautiful stars! – make up companies have been designing products to make average looking women look better. Or at least think they look better. Make up has been a staple of upscale department stores and high priced boutiques right from the very beginning of the retail business. Even in the early days, make up products had their own departments. Salesgirls were hired who exhibited a youthful, sparkling appearance. They would grab women by the hand, lead them to the sales counter, apply a bit of this, a dab of that and a puff of something else for free and then make the sale. Early products were marketed in the usual manner – for their value in improving your appearance and their price.

The first make up celebrities in the pre-infomercial era were not the stars that women were trying to emulate but the heads of the Hollywood make up departments who made the stars look so glamorous. And so the likes of Max Factor, make up master to countless female celebrities (and men too, by the way) and the most successful line of make up products were born. Later on the celebrities themselves, sensing a huge cash return for the use of their face, put themselves on various lines of make up products available in stores. When their looks faded, when their careers stopped humming along, the make up products disappeared as well.

And then came infomercials. All of a sudden there was a way to get women interested in buying make up products over their TV sets and was it ever successful! Sensing right from the outset that the products had to be celebrity driven, producers came up with a way to market their products to women all over the world via the TV set. Faded and fading stars from the music business, movie business and TV business jumped on the bandwagon to sell make up and other beauty supplies to American women by the truckload. Here’s the hook that they used: the make up infomercial and the products were not completely celebrity driven. The celebrity was merely there to endorse the products supposedly used on her over the years to keep her looking younger and more beautiful. But the product itself was created by, bore the name of and was demonstrated by the make up artist who had labored for years applying make up to countless beautiful celebrities. The make up artist was not a beauty herself but a “regular” woman who merely worked on celebrities. Hence, the housewife watching in Des Moines, or Chicago or anywhere was not made to feel ugly or less than glamorous.

In fact the celebrity was usually somewhat demeaned on make up infomercials as they would often appear on the show without any make up on. You would be channel surfing and a close up shot of a celebrity you know would appear on the screen and you’d stop, you’d notice she didn’t look so good. You’d wonder what happened and you’d start watching the infomercial. And you’d hear her talking endlessly about how her appearance, her look, her beauty was predominately the successful work of the artist and her line of amazing products while the artist was applying make up to her face and transforming her right before your very eyes.

And furthermore, YOU!, Miss American Average Woman, could have these same products that celebrities have been using for years to make movie magic happen, the secret stuff known only to Hollywood insiders, delivered right to your door in a few days for the low, low price of…well you get the idea. What a concept! Don’t get the beautiful celebrity, with the face of an angel, to sell the product. Have the average looking make up artist sell the product while the beautiful celebrity is transformed from average looking to gorgeous right before your eyes! And of course, the celebrity was an equal or even majority partner in the profits from the line, picking up millions along the way for a days work, sitting in a comfortable chair, in air conditioned splendour, having make up applied to their faces. As the man said – Only in America!

About the author:
Infomercials Info provides detailed information on exercise, weight loss, real estate, and make up infomercials and direct response (DRTV). Infomercials Info is affiliated with Business Plans by Growthink.

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